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F1 Is Over

Posts tagged Neon Lights

F1 Is Over. Now, What?

25 September 2016, Singapore


To be honest, we’re happy to see the back of F1. Inconvenient road diversions, changes in bus routes and too much, “Oh, look at me; I have a ticket to The Podium Lounge.”

Of course, it was great for some. And we’re happy for them.

But, F1 or no, this is Singapore and there’s plenty to keep us adequately occupied until the madness of Christmas hits, which will be too soon.

This is our quick list of good stuff.

1. POWER RECORDS: ON UNTIL 31 OCTOBER, KULT GALLERY (FREE ADMISSION)

Every so often, an exhibition comes around to remind us of the passion that some curators put into their work. According to assistant curator Tulika Ahuja, she and the team engaged some 20 artists to express their thoughts on the intersection of art and music. The artists were at liberty to choose their medium and messaging. All artwork as well as collectibles such as zines, vinyls - and the most awesome Sesame Street turntable in the universe - are for sale.

Here’s a more detailed description of one that we particularly liked.

Work Title: Head Cut (Juju by Siouxsie and the Banshees, 1981)
By: Qi Xuan
Year of Completion: 2016
Medium: Polymer clay

“Oh severed head
I'll feed your head with bread
And paint your lips bright red
I'll keep it fresh on ice
It will look very nice

Can I take it with me
Back to flat with me”

- Siouxsie and the Banshees

Qi Xuan: “Head Cut is an artwork inspired by the album Juju by the 80s rock band Siouxsie and the Banshees. It is made for the Kult's Power Records show, which features artworks inspired by music from the 80s. To capture the dark, ominous mood of Juju, my artwork has both haunting and dreamy elements. The gumball machine elicits memories of childhood and wonder, while the severed sleeping heads paint a layer of violence and vulnerability.

People either love or hate my work. It is funny because each time I post my works on my social media account, I lose and gain a fair number of followers. I do not find my works morbid at all, but there are people who told me they are disturbed by them. I have never wanted my works to have a shock value because I find that vulgar and sometimes it gets in the way of the meaning behind the work. I strive for something quieter and more poetic and, sometimes, people do get it.”

“Head Cut” is for sale at $1,800.

For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/161540750919270/

2. DEEPAVALI: 29 OCTOBER (FREE PASS TO CELEBRATE)

This is a Hindu festival that is also known as the “Festival of Lights”.  It is characterised by splashes of colour, the lighting of oil lamps and very good food. Little India is an obvious place to visit to soak it all in, where the shops and streets are decorated with all things Deepavali – peacocks, oil lamps and voluminous jasmine garlands. If you can wrangle a house or temple visit with a friend, do it; the atmosphere - and meaning - is magnified to the nth.

For more information: Head down to Little India (the North-East and Downtown lines on the MRT). 

3. SINGAPORE WRITERS FESTIVAL: 04 TO 13 NOVEMBER

This year’s edition of the Singapore Writer’s Festival promises to be bigger and better. With more than 300 events spanning two weekends, it feels like it’s approaching the complexity of a trade convention. But, the team at the National Arts Council have always managed to find something for everyone; whether it is performances, a programming belt for children or diverse panels where local and international writers trade insights about everything under the sun, or “sayang”, which is the theme of this year’s festival. “Sayang” is a Malay word that has multiple possibilities of meaning – for example, it could mean love or a bittersweet sense of a lost opportunity. A festival pass gets you access to most of the events, although some signature lectures and workshops require separate tickets.

For more information and tickets: https://www.singaporewritersfestival.com/nacswf/nacswf.html

Image: Singapore Writers Festival Facebook page

4. NEON LIGHTS: 26 AND 27 NOVEMBER, FORT CANNING PARK

It might seem as though Singapore is up to its eyeballs in festivals, but Neon Lights is the only one that presents a great mix of music and the arts. Set in the historic Fort Canning Park, it’s two days of true-blue festival fun – workshops, activities for the kids, food and drink, and wicked music by the likes of Foals, Sigur Ros, Crystal Castles, George Clinton, Yuna and Gentle Bones. Spray on the mosquito repellent and bring your jiggy with you. Gates open at 2pm.

For more information and tickets: www.neonlights.sg

Image: Neon Lights Facebook page

5. ZOUKOUT SINGAPORE: 09 T0 10 DECEMBER, SENTOSA

If you missed the Boracay edition in April, ZoukOut x Summer Sonic in August in Tokyo and don’t reckon you’ll make Hong Kong in October, there’s still December in Singapore to catch the region’s premier dance music festival. Seriously, how many chances does one expect?

We hear it’s really good.

For more information and tickets: http://zoukout.com/2016/

Image: ZoukOut Facebook page

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